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May 2007 Newsletter

Check your training records!

Upcoming Dangerous Goods Training Dates at JFK and on the web

  • May 29-30-31, Dangerous Goods by Ocean - Initial Training
  • June 5, Dangerous Goods by Ocean - Recurrent Training
  • June 19-20-21, Dangerous Goods by Air - Initial Training
  • Our new On Line Training Program for the Cosmetics Industry - available 24/7.

All of the above live training classes will feature the new 2007 editions of the regulations.

Our complete 2007 training schedule is posted on this website.

Check your current training records - if you are close to the expiration date make your reservations now for any of our classes throughout the year. We always remind attendees a few days prior to the class.

TSA
The requirement for Security Threat Assessment submissions for agents of aircraft operators, foreign air carriers and indirect air carriers has been extended to July 15, 2007.

After the above date aircraft operators and indirect air carriers (air freight forwarders) may not allow unescorted access to air cargo for any individual unless the operator has submitted the information for that individual to TSA.


Overpacks

What is an overpack?

U.S. D.O.T. version -
Overpack, except as provided in subpart K of part 178 of this subchapter (i.e., radioactive materials packagings), means an enclosure that is used by a single consignor to provide protection or convenience in handling of a package or to consolidate two or more packages. Overpack does not include a transport vehicle, freight container, or aircraft unit load device. Examples of overpacks are one or more packages:

  1. Placed or stacked onto a load board such as a pallet and secured by strapping, shrink wrapping, stretch wrapping, or other suitable means; or
  2. Placed in a protective outer packaging such as a box or crate.

ICAO, IATA and IMDG definitions are essentially the same.

A few examples that we see rather frequently:

A shipment of 20 cases (fibreboard boxes) of UN 1263, Paint, Class 3, PG III. Each case contains four 5-litre metal cans. Each fibreboard box is addressed, marked and labeled and in proper condition for carriage. This type of packing is identified as "combination packaging."

The boxes are stacked tightly onto a wood pallet, and then shrink-wrapped. That is a typical overpack that you might see shipped by any mode of transportation.

The documentation for air would indicate UN 1263, Paint, Class 3, PG III, 20 Fibreboard Boxes x 20 Litres. “Overpack Used” Total net quantity 400 Litres.

The shrink-wrapped overpack would be marked and labeled in the same manner as the individual fibreboard boxes and additionally would be marked with the word “Overpack” and the total quantity (400 litres).

For highway and ocean the documentation would read:
UN 1263, Paint, Class 3, PG III, 20 Fibreboard Boxes @ 440 kgs.  “Overpack Used”
(note that gross weight is appropriate for highway, rail, and ocean)

Often confused as an overpack,  but it is not -
A shipment of 20 fibreboard boxes, each box contains 6 half-litre metal cans of UN 1263, paint, Class 3, PG III, and, 6 half-litre plastic bottles of UN 1805, Phosphoric Acid Solution Class 8, PG III. This method of packing is also a "combination package."
Our documentation for air would read:

UN 1263, paint, Class 3, PG III; 3 Litres P/I 309
UN 2834, Phosphoric Acid, Class 8, PG III 3 Litres P/I 819
All packed in one fibreboard box x 20
Q=0.7

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If we shrink-wrapped those 20 boxes to a pallet, only then does it become an overpack.

Background: In this example, we would have to determine first if the different hazard classes are compatible, requiring us to check the segregation tables. Yes, they could be packaged together safely.

By air, we also would be required to determine the "Q Value" to make sure that we have not exceeded the quantity limitations per package. The formula is Q = n1/M1 +  n2/M2

("Q" can not exceed the value of 1)

"n1" is the total net quantity of the first chemical that I intend to place in the package. "M1" is the total quantity of that first chemical that I can legally place in the package. In this example, by air, "n1" represents the six half-litre cans of paint that I intend to place in the box. UN 1263, Class 3, PG IIII, which is 3 litres.

M1 is the maximum quantity that we are permitted to place in the package - in this case, under Packing Instruction 309 by air, would be 60 litres. 

Dividing 3 by 60 we end up with a (paint) value of 0.05 - rounded up to 0.1

"n2" is the total net quantity of the second chemical that I intend to place in the same package. "M2" is the total quantity of the second chemical that I can legally place in the package. In this example, by air, "n2" represents the six half-litre cans of paint that I intend to place in the box. UN 1805, Class 8, PG IIII, which is also 3 litres.

M2 is the maximum quantity that we are permitted to place in the package - in this case, under Packing Instruction 819 by air, would be 5 litres. 

Dividing 3 by 5, we have a value of 0.6 for the phosphoric acid.

Adding 0.1 (paint) and 0.6 (phosphoric acid gives us a Q Value of 0.7

And, finally,
Unit load device means any type of freight container, aircraft container, aircraft pallet with a net, or aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo
.


R.I.P.

On May 22nd DGAC advised us of the passing of  John Eversole,  Retired Chief of the Chicago Fire Department. John  was an inspiration to all who have crossed his path. Your writer met Chief Eversole on three occasions - the last one being in Tempe, Arizona during November 2002 at a Dangerous Goods Advisory Council convention. He had been presented with the DGAC's George Wilson Award.

Each year, DGAC presents the George L. Wilson Award to an individual, organization or company that has demonstrated outstanding achievement in the field of hazardous materials transportation safety. This prestigious honor is awarded in memory of our first President, George Wilson, who was recognized for his many contributions and life-long dedication to improving the safe transportation of hazardous materials.

John Eversole was an eloquent speaker - not so much as a college English professor but as a passionate human being that had "been there - done that" type of individual, who inspired all of us that believe in the safety of people in transportation, regular business and the community.

We do not have the space to list all of his accomplishments. His friend and colleague, Greg Noll of Lancaster, Pennsylvania said it best in his announcement to DGAC concerning John's passing:

"John Eversole 's do not come along everyday in our life. But the John Eversole 's do have a profound influence upon our profession that continues long after they have passed. Never, never forget just how important our jobs are and the impact that they have upon our communities and our country. As John would tell all of us, "Never stop fighting."

John Eversole - Rest in Peace.


Dangerous Goods Advisory Council

The 29th Annual Conference Is Coming!

Join DGAC this November in the beautiful city of Santa Fe, New Mexico for the 29th Annual Conference and Hazardous Materials Transportation Exposition.

Check the DGAC Website for additional information at www.dgac.org

 

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